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Usefulness of Serum High-Density Lipoprotein Cholesterol Level as an Independent Predictor of One-Year Mortality After Percutaneous Coronary Interventions

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dc.contributor.author Ghazzal Z.B.
dc.contributor.author Dhawan S.S.
dc.contributor.author Sheikh A.
dc.contributor.author Douglas J.S.
dc.contributor.author Veledar E.
dc.contributor.author Mavromatis K.
dc.contributor.author Pohlel F.K.
dc.contributor.author Vaccarino V.
dc.contributor.editor
dc.date Apr-2009
dc.date.accessioned 2017-10-05T15:37:38Z
dc.date.available 2017-10-05T15:37:38Z
dc.date.issued 2009
dc.identifier 10.1016/j.amjcard.2008.11.053
dc.identifier.isbn
dc.identifier.issn 00029149
dc.identifier.uri http://hdl.handle.net/10938/15840
dc.description.abstract Low levels of high-density lipoprotein (HDL) cholesterol are a marker of coronary artery disease progression and are associated with cardiovascular events. However, whether low HDL cholesterol is a useful prognostic indicator after percutaneous coronary intervention (PCI) is not known. In a sample of 4,088 patients who underwent PCI we evaluated 1-year mortality and repeat revascularization as a function of baseline HDL levels classified into approximate quartiles of very low (35 mg-dl), low (35 to 40 mg-dl), medium (41 to 47 mg-dl) and high (48 to 120 mg-dl) HDL cholesterol. Decreasing levels of HDL cholesterol were associated with younger age, male gender, smoking, diabetes mellitus, and a history of bypass surgery (p 0.0001 for all). One-year mortality and coronary revascularization were significantly higher in the very low HDL cholesterol group compared with the other groups (very low HDL cholesterol 6.5percent and 25.4percent, respectively; low HDL cholesterol 3.1percent and 20.8percent; medium HDL cholesterol 4.3percent and 22.7percent; high HDL cholesterol 3.1percent and 20.6percent, p = 0.0001 and p = 0.007). One-year mortality was significantly higher in men with an HDL cholesterol level 33 mg-dL and in women with an HDL cholesterol level 38 mg-dL. In multivariable analysis, very low HDL was associated with nearly twofold the risk of death after adjusting for other independent predictors of outcome. In conclusion, in patients with coronary artery disease undergoing PCI, a baseline HDL cholesterol level 35mg-dl is an important prognostic indicator. Baseline HDL cholesterol levels 33 mg-dl for men and 38 mg-dl were associated with higher one-year mortality after PCI. © 2009 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.
dc.format.extent
dc.format.extent Pages: (902-906)
dc.language English
dc.publisher BRIDGEWATER
dc.relation.ispartof Publication Name: American Journal of Cardiology; Publication Year: 2009; Volume: 103; no. 7; Pages: (902-906);
dc.relation.ispartofseries
dc.relation.uri
dc.source Scopus
dc.subject.other
dc.title Usefulness of Serum High-Density Lipoprotein Cholesterol Level as an Independent Predictor of One-Year Mortality After Percutaneous Coronary Interventions
dc.type Article
dc.contributor.affiliation Ghazzal, Z.B., Division of Cardiology, Department of Medicine, Emory University School of Medicine, Atlanta, GA, United States, American University of Beirut, Beirut, Lebanon
dc.contributor.affiliation Dhawan, S.S., Division of Cardiology, Department of Medicine, Emory University School of Medicine, Atlanta, GA, United States
dc.contributor.affiliation Sheikh, A., Division of Cardiology, Department of Medicine, Emory University School of Medicine, Atlanta, GA, United States
dc.contributor.affiliation Douglas, J.S., Division of Cardiology, Department of Medicine, Emory University School of Medicine, Atlanta, GA, United States
dc.contributor.affiliation Veledar, E., Division of Cardiology, Department of Medicine, Emory University School of Medicine, Atlanta, GA, United States
dc.contributor.affiliation Mavromatis, K., Division of Cardiology, Department of Medicine, Emory University School of Medicine, Atlanta, GA, United States
dc.contributor.affiliation Pohlel, F.K., Division of Cardiology, Department of Medicine, Emory University School of Medicine, Atlanta, GA, United States
dc.contributor.affiliation Vaccarino, V., Division of Cardiology, Department of Medicine, Emory University School of Medicine, Atlanta, GA, United States, Rollins School of Public Health, Emory University, Atlanta, GA, United States
dc.contributor.authorAddress Ghazzal, Z.B.; Division of Cardiology, Department of Medicine, Emory University School of Medicine, Atlanta, GA, United States; email: ziyad.ghazzal@emoryhealthcare.org
dc.contributor.authorCorporate University: American University of Beirut Medical Center; Faculty: Faculty of Medicine; Department: Internal Medicine;
dc.contributor.authorDepartment Internal Medicine
dc.contributor.authorDivision
dc.contributor.authorEmail ziyad.ghazzal@emoryhealthcare.org
dc.contributor.authorFaculty Faculty of Medicine
dc.contributor.authorInitials Ghazzal, ZB
dc.contributor.authorInitials Dhawan, SS
dc.contributor.authorInitials Sheikh, A
dc.contributor.authorInitials Douglas, JS
dc.contributor.authorInitials Veledar, E
dc.contributor.authorInitials Mavromatis, K
dc.contributor.authorInitials Khan-Pohlel, F
dc.contributor.authorInitials Vaccarino, V
dc.contributor.authorOrcidID Veledar, Emir-0000-0002-3831-5433
dc.contributor.authorReprintAddress Ghazzal, ZB (reprint author), Emory Univ, Div Cardiol, Dept Med, Sch Med, Atlanta, GA 30322 USA.
dc.contributor.authorResearcherID Veledar, Emir-K-2808-2012
dc.contributor.authorUniversity American University of Beirut Medical Center
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dc.description.citedCount 13
dc.description.citedTotWOSCount 11
dc.description.citedWOSCount 10
dc.format.extentCount 5
dc.identifier.articleNo
dc.identifier.coden AJCDA
dc.identifier.pubmedID 19327413
dc.identifier.scopusID 62849086187
dc.identifier.url
dc.publisher.address 685 ROUTE 202-206 STE 3, BRIDGEWATER, NJ 08807 USA
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dc.relation.ispartofConferenceCode
dc.relation.ispartofConferenceDate
dc.relation.ispartofConferenceHosting
dc.relation.ispartofConferenceLoc
dc.relation.ispartofConferenceSponsor
dc.relation.ispartofConferenceTitle
dc.relation.ispartofFundingAgency
dc.relation.ispartOfISOAbbr Am. J. Cardiol.
dc.relation.ispartOfIssue 7
dc.relation.ispartOfPart
dc.relation.ispartofPubTitle American Journal of Cardiology
dc.relation.ispartofPubTitleAbbr Am. J. Cardiol.
dc.relation.ispartOfSpecialIssue
dc.relation.ispartOfSuppl
dc.relation.ispartOfVolume 103
dc.source.ID WOS:000264819000002
dc.type.publication Journal
dc.subject.otherAuthKeyword
dc.subject.otherChemCAS Biological Markers
dc.subject.otherChemCAS Cholesterol, HDL
dc.subject.otherIndex high density lipoprotein cholesterol
dc.subject.otherIndex adult
dc.subject.otherIndex age
dc.subject.otherIndex aged
dc.subject.otherIndex article
dc.subject.otherIndex bypass surgery
dc.subject.otherIndex cholesterol blood level
dc.subject.otherIndex death
dc.subject.otherIndex diabetes mellitus
dc.subject.otherIndex female
dc.subject.otherIndex gender
dc.subject.otherIndex human
dc.subject.otherIndex major clinical study
dc.subject.otherIndex male
dc.subject.otherIndex mortality
dc.subject.otherIndex outcome assessment
dc.subject.otherIndex percutaneous coronary intervention
dc.subject.otherIndex prediction
dc.subject.otherIndex priority journal
dc.subject.otherIndex prognosis
dc.subject.otherIndex risk assessment
dc.subject.otherIndex risk factor
dc.subject.otherIndex sex difference
dc.subject.otherIndex smoking
dc.subject.otherIndex Aged
dc.subject.otherIndex Angioplasty, Transluminal, Percutaneous Coronary
dc.subject.otherIndex Biological Markers
dc.subject.otherIndex Cholesterol, HDL
dc.subject.otherIndex Female
dc.subject.otherIndex Follow-Up Studies
dc.subject.otherIndex Georgia
dc.subject.otherIndex Humans
dc.subject.otherIndex Male
dc.subject.otherIndex Middle Aged
dc.subject.otherIndex Myocardial Ischemia
dc.subject.otherIndex Prognosis
dc.subject.otherIndex Prospective Studies
dc.subject.otherIndex Recurrence
dc.subject.otherIndex Risk Factors
dc.subject.otherIndex Sex Factors
dc.subject.otherIndex Survival Rate
dc.subject.otherKeywordPlus CARDIOVASCULAR-DISEASE MORTALITY
dc.subject.otherKeywordPlus HEART-DISEASE
dc.subject.otherKeywordPlus HDL CHOLESTEROL
dc.subject.otherKeywordPlus FOLLOW-UP
dc.subject.otherKeywordPlus PREVALENCE
dc.subject.otherKeywordPlus FRAMINGHAM
dc.subject.otherKeywordPlus LIPIDS
dc.subject.otherKeywordPlus TRIAL
dc.subject.otherWOS Cardiac and Cardiovascular Systems


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