AUB ScholarWorks

Evaluation of a multilocus variable-number tandem-repeat analysis scheme for typing human Brucella isolates in a region of brucellosis endemicity

Show simple item record

dc.contributor.author Kattar M.M.
dc.contributor.author Jaafar R.F.
dc.contributor.author Araj G.F.
dc.contributor.author Le Fleche P.
dc.contributor.author Matar G.M.
dc.contributor.author Rached R.A.
dc.contributor.author Khalife S.
dc.contributor.author Vergnaud G.
dc.contributor.editor
dc.date Dec-2008
dc.date.accessioned 2017-10-05T15:59:22Z
dc.date.available 2017-10-05T15:59:22Z
dc.date.issued 2008
dc.identifier 10.1128/JCM.00464-08
dc.identifier.isbn
dc.identifier.issn 00951137
dc.identifier.uri http://hdl.handle.net/10938/18970
dc.description.abstract Brucellosis remains an important anthropozoonosis worldwide. Brucella species are genetically homogeneous, and thus, the typing of Brucella species for epidemiological purposes by conventional molecular typing methods has remained elusive. Although many methods could segregate isolates into the phylogenetically recognized taxa, limited within-species genetic diversity has been identified. Recently, multilocus variable-number tandem-repeat analysis (MLVA) was found to have a high degree of resolution when it was applied to collections of Brucella isolates from geographically widespread locations, and an assay comprising 16 such loci (MLVA-16) was proposed. This scheme includes eight minisatellite loci (panel 1) and eight microsatellites (panel 2, which is subdivided into panels 2A and 2B). The utility of MLVA-16 for the subtyping of human Brucella isolates from geographically restricted regions needs to be further evaluated, and genotyping databases with worldwide coverage must be progressively established. In the present study, MLVA-16 was applied to the typing of 42 human Brucella isolates obtained from 41 patients recovered from 2002 to 2006 at a tertiary-care center in Lebanon. All isolates were identified as Brucella melitensis by MLVA-16 and were found to be closely related to B. melitensis isolates from neighboring countries in the Middle East when their genotypes were queried against those in the web-based Brucella2007 MLVA database (http:--mlva.u-psud.fr-). Panel 2B, which comprised the most variable loci, displayed a very high discriminatory power, while panels 1 and 2A showed limited diversity. The most frequent genotype comprised seven isolates obtained over 7 weeks in 2002, demonstrating an outbreak from a common source. Two isolates obtained from one patient 5 months apart comprised another genotype, indicating relapsing disease. These findings confirm that MLVA-16 has a good discriminatory power for species determination, typing of B. melitensis isolates, and inferring their geographical origin. Abbreviated panel 2B could be used as a short-term epidemiological tool in a small region of endemicity. Copyright © 2008, American Society for Microbiology. All Rights Reserved.
dc.format.extent
dc.format.extent Pages: (3935-3940)
dc.language English
dc.publisher WASHINGTON
dc.relation.ispartof Publication Name: Journal of Clinical Microbiology; Publication Year: 2008; Volume: 46; no. 12; Pages: (3935-3940);
dc.relation.ispartofseries
dc.relation.uri
dc.source Scopus
dc.subject.other
dc.title Evaluation of a multilocus variable-number tandem-repeat analysis scheme for typing human Brucella isolates in a region of brucellosis endemicity
dc.type Article
dc.contributor.affiliation Kattar, M.M., Department of Pathology and Laboratory Medicine, American University of Beirut, Beirut, Lebanon, World Health Organization Regional Collaborating Center on Human Brucellosis, Beirut, Lebanon, Department of Pathology and Laboratory Medicine, American University, Beirut Medical Center, Cairo Street, Beirut, Lebanon
dc.contributor.affiliation Jaafar, R.F., Department of Microbiology and Immunology, American University of Beirut, Beirut, Lebanon
dc.contributor.affiliation Araj, G.F., Department of Pathology and Laboratory Medicine, American University of Beirut, Beirut, Lebanon, World Health Organization Regional Collaborating Center on Human Brucellosis, Beirut, Lebanon
dc.contributor.affiliation Le Flèche, P., Université Paris-Sud 11, CNRS, UMR8621, Institut de Génétique et Microbiologie, Orsay 91405, France, Department of Analytical Microbiology, Centre d'Etudes du Bouchet, Vert le Petit 91710, France
dc.contributor.affiliation Matar, G.M., Department of Microbiology and Immunology, American University of Beirut, Beirut, Lebanon
dc.contributor.affiliation Rached, R.A., Department of Pathology and Laboratory Medicine, American University of Beirut, Beirut, Lebanon, World Health Organization Regional Collaborating Center on Human Brucellosis, Beirut, Lebanon
dc.contributor.affiliation Khalife, S., Department of Pathology and Laboratory Medicine, American University of Beirut, Beirut, Lebanon, World Health Organization Regional Collaborating Center on Human Brucellosis, Beirut, Lebanon
dc.contributor.affiliation Vergnaud, G., Université Paris-Sud 11, CNRS, UMR8621, Institut de Génétique et Microbiologie, Orsay 91405, France, DGA-D4S-Mission Pour la Recherche et l'Innovation Scientifique, Bagneux 92220, France
dc.contributor.authorAddress Kattar, M. M.; Department of Pathology and Laboratory Medicine, American University, Beirut Medical Center, Cairo Street, Beirut, Lebanon; email: mireillekattar@gmail.com
dc.contributor.authorCorporate University: American University of Beirut Medical Center; Faculty: Faculty of Medicine; Department: Pathology and Laboratory Medicine;
dc.contributor.authorDepartment Pathology and Laboratory Medicine
dc.contributor.authorDivision
dc.contributor.authorEmail mireillekattar@gmail.com; gilles.vergnaud@u-psud.fr
dc.contributor.authorFaculty Faculty of Medicine
dc.contributor.authorInitials Kattar, MM
dc.contributor.authorInitials Jaafar, RF
dc.contributor.authorInitials Araj, GF
dc.contributor.authorInitials Le Fleche, P
dc.contributor.authorInitials Matar, GM
dc.contributor.authorInitials Rached, RA
dc.contributor.authorInitials Khalife, S
dc.contributor.authorInitials Vergnaud, G
dc.contributor.authorOrcidID
dc.contributor.authorReprintAddress Kattar, MM (reprint author), Amer Univ Beirut, Med Ctr, Dept Pathol and Lab Med, Cairo St, Beirut, Lebanon.
dc.contributor.authorResearcherID
dc.contributor.authorUniversity American University of Beirut Medical Center
dc.description.cited ALDAHOUK S, 2005, CHEMOTHERAPY, V511, P352; Al Dahouk S, 2007, J MICROBIOL METH, V69, P137, DOI 10.1016-j.mimet.2006.12.015; Al Dahouk S, 2007, EMERG INFECT DIS, V13, P1895, DOI 10.3201-eid1312.070527; ALLARDETSERVENT A, 1988, J BACTERIOL, V170, P4603; Araj G F, 1999, Clin Lab Sci, V12, P207; Bricker BJ, 2005, BMC MICROBIOL, V5, DOI 10.1186-1471-2180-5-37; Bricker BJ, 2003, BMC MICROBIOL, V3, DOI 10.1186-1471-2180-3-15; Ciammaruconi A, 2008, BMC MICROBIOL, V8, DOI 10.1186-1471-2180-8-21; Cloeckaert A, 2002, VET MICROBIOL, V90, P229, DOI 10.1016-S0378-1135(02)00211-0; Corbel MJ, 1997, EMERG INFECT DIS, V3, P213; Foster G, 2007, INT J SYST EVOL MICR, V57, P2688, DOI 10.1099-ijs.0.65269-0; Gandara B, 2001, J CLIN MICROBIOL, V39, P235, DOI 10.1128-JCM.39.1.235-240.2001; Garcia-Yoldi D, 2007, VACCINE, V25, P2858, DOI 10.1016-j.vaccine.2006.09.063; Garcia-Yoldi D, 2007, J CLIN MICROBIOL, V45, P4070, DOI 10.1128-JCM.01096-07; Gee JE, 2004, J CLIN MICROBIOL, V42, P3649, DOI 10.1128-jcm.42.8.3649-3654.2004; GRISSA L, 2007, BIOCHIMIE, V90, P660; Grundmann H, 2001, J CLIN MICROBIOL, V39, P4190, DOI 10.1128-JCM.39.11.4190-4192.2001; Halling SM, 2005, J BACTERIOL, V187, P2715, DOI 10.1128-JB.187.8.2715-2726.2005; HUBBARD DJ, 2007, 107 GEN M AM SOC MIC; HUNTER PR, 1988, J CLIN MICROBIOL, V26, P2465; Kattar MM, 2007, DIAGN MICR INFEC DIS, V59, P23, DOI 10.1016-j.diagmicrobio.2007.04.002; LEFLECHE P, 2006, BMC MICROBIOL, V143, P2913; Lista F, 2006, BMC MICROBIOL, V6, DOI 10.1186-1471-2180-6-33; Marianelli C, 2007, J CLIN MICROBIOL, V45, P2923, DOI 10.1128-JCM.00822-07; MELZER F, 2008, INT BRUC RES C LOND; Mercier E, 1996, J CLIN MICROBIOL, V34, P1299; MichauxCharachon S, 1997, J BACTERIOL, V179, P3244; Moreno E, 2002, VET MICROBIOL, V90, P209, DOI 10.1016-S0378-1135(02)00210-9; Pappas G, 2006, LANCET INFECT DIS, V6, P91, DOI 10.1016-S1473-3099(06)70382-6; Ratushna VG, 2006, BMC MICROBIOL, V6, DOI 10.1186-1471-2180-6-13; ROTH LD, 2002, EMERG INFECT DIS, V8, P225; Scholz HC, 2008, INT J SYST EVOL MICR, V58, P375, DOI 10.1099-ijs.0.65356-0; Scholz HC, 2008, EMERG INFECT DIS, V14, P1316, DOI 10.3201-eid1408.080286; SCHOLZ HC, 2008, VECTOR BORNE ZOONOTI; Tcherneva E, 2000, J APPL MICROBIOL, V88, P69, DOI 10.1046-j.1365-2672.2000.00945.x; Tcherneva E, 1996, VET MICROBIOL, V51, P169, DOI 10.1016-0378-1135(96)00036-3; Valdezate S, 2007, CLIN MICROBIOL INFEC, V13, P887, DOI 10.1111-j.1469-0691.2007.01768.x; van Belkum A, 2007, CLIN MICROBIOL INFEC, V13, P1, DOI 10.1111-j.1469-0691.2007.01786.x; VERGER JM, 1985, INT J SYST BACTERIOL, V35, P292; Vergnaud G, 2006, MOL IDENTIFICATION S, P83, DOI 10.1007-978-3-540-31292-5_4; Whatmore AM, 2006, J CLIN MICROBIOL, V44, P1982, DOI 10.1128-JCM.02039-05; Whatmore AM, 2007, BMC MICROBIOL, V7, DOI 10.1186-1471-2180-7-34; Whatmore AM, 2005, J CLIN MICROBIOL, V43, P761, DOI 10.1128-JCM.43.2.761-769.2005
dc.description.citedCount 42
dc.description.citedTotWOSCount 46
dc.description.citedWOSCount 38
dc.format.extentCount 6
dc.identifier.articleNo
dc.identifier.coden JCMID
dc.identifier.pubmedID 18923007
dc.identifier.scopusID 57349195589
dc.identifier.url
dc.publisher.address 1752 N ST NW, WASHINGTON, DC 20036-2904 USA
dc.relation.ispartofConference
dc.relation.ispartofConferenceCode
dc.relation.ispartofConferenceDate
dc.relation.ispartofConferenceHosting
dc.relation.ispartofConferenceLoc
dc.relation.ispartofConferenceSponsor
dc.relation.ispartofConferenceTitle
dc.relation.ispartofFundingAgency
dc.relation.ispartOfISOAbbr J. Clin. Microbiol.
dc.relation.ispartOfIssue 12
dc.relation.ispartOfPart
dc.relation.ispartofPubTitle Journal of Clinical Microbiology
dc.relation.ispartofPubTitleAbbr J. Clin. Microbiol.
dc.relation.ispartOfSpecialIssue
dc.relation.ispartOfSuppl
dc.relation.ispartOfVolume 46
dc.source.ID WOS:000261247900011
dc.type.publication Journal
dc.subject.otherAuthKeyword
dc.subject.otherChemCAS DNA, Bacterial
dc.subject.otherIndex bacterial DNA
dc.subject.otherIndex microsatellite DNA
dc.subject.otherIndex article
dc.subject.otherIndex Brucella melitensis
dc.subject.otherIndex brucellosis
dc.subject.otherIndex endemic disease
dc.subject.otherIndex genetic analysis
dc.subject.otherIndex genotype
dc.subject.otherIndex geographic distribution
dc.subject.otherIndex human
dc.subject.otherIndex multilocus variable number tandem repeat analysis
dc.subject.otherIndex nonhuman
dc.subject.otherIndex priority journal
dc.subject.otherIndex Bacterial Typing Techniques
dc.subject.otherIndex Brucella melitensis
dc.subject.otherIndex Brucellosis
dc.subject.otherIndex Cluster Analysis
dc.subject.otherIndex Disease Outbreaks
dc.subject.otherIndex DNA, Bacterial
dc.subject.otherIndex Endemic Diseases
dc.subject.otherIndex Epidemiology, Molecular
dc.subject.otherIndex Genotype
dc.subject.otherIndex Humans
dc.subject.otherIndex Lebanon
dc.subject.otherIndex Minisatellite Repeats
dc.subject.otherIndex Brucella
dc.subject.otherIndex Brucella melitensis
dc.subject.otherKeywordPlus POLYMERASE-CHAIN-REACTION
dc.subject.otherKeywordPlus GENETIC DIVERSITY
dc.subject.otherKeywordPlus BACILLUS-ANTHRACIS
dc.subject.otherKeywordPlus GENUS BRUCELLA
dc.subject.otherKeywordPlus STRAINS
dc.subject.otherKeywordPlus IDENTIFICATION
dc.subject.otherKeywordPlus POLYMORPHISM
dc.subject.otherKeywordPlus EPIDEMIOLOGY
dc.subject.otherKeywordPlus MELITENSIS
dc.subject.otherKeywordPlus SEQUENCE
dc.subject.otherWOS Microbiology


Files in this item

Files Size Format View

There are no files associated with this item.

This item appears in the following Collection(s)

Show simple item record

Search AUB ScholarWorks


Browse

My Account