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Managing climate change effects on relic forest ecosystems: A program for Lebanese cedar

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dc.contributor.author Sattout E.J.
dc.contributor.author Nemer N.
dc.contributor.editor
dc.date 2008
dc.date.accessioned 2017-10-18T13:27:44Z
dc.date.available 2017-10-18T13:27:44Z
dc.date.issued 2008
dc.identifier
dc.identifier.isbn
dc.identifier.issn 14888386
dc.identifier.uri http://hdl.handle.net/10938/20424
dc.description.abstract The effect of climate change on forests varies with the geographical zone and climatic conditions of countries and regions. While climatic records for the Western Mediterranean show slight trends towards warmer and drier conditions over the last century, parts of the Eastern Mediterranean have experienced cooler and wetter conditions. Mediterranean forests are likely to be impacted by these changes, which could reduce their mitigation potential. If climate change occurs faster than new ecosystem structure and function can be developed, then the historical relationships between animal, plant and climatic conditions may not be reestablished and biological diversity will be reduced. During the last three decades, an expansion of the geographic range of major forest insect pests, caused by increased winter temperatures, have been observed worldwide. In Lebanon, changes in climatic conditions are linked with an altitudinal shift in bioclimatic zones. Cedar forest reserves, typical of the Montane-Mediterranean zone, recognized worldwide for their biological, cultural, historical and social value have been facing major threats. An alarming indicator appeared in these forests in the late 1990s where a web-spinning sawfly affected 70percent of one of the largest populations of Cedar (Cedrus libani A.) forests in Lebanon. The newly-discovered insect, Cephalcia tannourinensis Chevin, now threatens the survival of several important Cedar forests, namely the Tannourine Cedar Forest Nature Reserve, the Hadeth El Jebbeh Forest, and the Bsharry Forest. Recognizing the value of these relic ecosystems, national stakeholders have been proactive in attracting international funds to conserve them, monitor their flora and fauna diversity and to remediate and prevent climate change effects at both national and regional levels. Although the pest management program was satisfactory, work on the sawfly's biology revealed that it would increase again rapidly unless climate change effects could be mitigated. The definition of adequate mitigation and adaptation measures requires the development of monitoring programmes integrating biotic and abiotic parameters. This article highlights the importance of these Cedar forests and the strategy adopted for managing the pest outbreak through the implementation of an integrated management program. It presents a monitoring plan for Cedar forest ecosystems under the effects of climate change.
dc.format.extent
dc.format.extent Pages: (122-130)
dc.language English
dc.relation.ispartof Publication Name: Biodiversity; Publication Year: 2008; Volume: 9; no. 41702; Pages: (122-130);
dc.relation.ispartofseries
dc.relation.uri
dc.source Scopus
dc.title Managing climate change effects on relic forest ecosystems: A program for Lebanese cedar
dc.type Article
dc.contributor.affiliation Sattout, E.J., IUCN-World Commission on Protected Area, P.O. Box 158, Jounieh, Lebanon
dc.contributor.affiliation Nemer, N., Faculty of Agricultural and Food Sciences, American University of Beirut, P.O. Box 110236, Beirut, Lebanon
dc.contributor.authorAddress Sattout, E. J.; IUCN-World Commission on Protected Area, P.O. Box 158, Jounieh, Lebanon; email: elsa@intracom.net.lb
dc.contributor.authorCorporate University: American University of Beirut; Faculty: Faculty of Agricultural and Food Sciences; Department: FAFS;
dc.contributor.authorDepartment FAFS
dc.contributor.authorDivision
dc.contributor.authorEmail
dc.contributor.authorFaculty Faculty of Agricultural and Food Sciences
dc.contributor.authorInitials
dc.contributor.authorOrcidID
dc.contributor.authorReprintAddress
dc.contributor.authorResearcherID
dc.contributor.authorUniversity American University of Beirut
dc.description.cited
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dc.format.extentCount 9
dc.identifier.articleNo
dc.identifier.coden
dc.identifier.pubmedID
dc.identifier.scopusID 73849090901
dc.identifier.url
dc.publisher.address
dc.relation.ispartofConference
dc.relation.ispartofConferenceCode
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dc.relation.ispartofConferenceHosting
dc.relation.ispartofConferenceLoc
dc.relation.ispartofConferenceSponsor
dc.relation.ispartofConferenceTitle
dc.relation.ispartofFundingAgency
dc.relation.ispartOfISOAbbr
dc.relation.ispartOfIssue 41702
dc.relation.ispartOfPart
dc.relation.ispartofPubTitle Biodiversity
dc.relation.ispartofPubTitleAbbr Biodiversity
dc.relation.ispartOfSpecialIssue
dc.relation.ispartOfSuppl
dc.relation.ispartOfVolume 9
dc.source.ID
dc.type.publication Journal
dc.subject.otherAuthKeyword Adaptive management
dc.subject.otherAuthKeyword cedar
dc.subject.otherAuthKeyword cephalcia tannourinensis
dc.subject.otherAuthKeyword monitoring program
dc.subject.otherAuthKeyword pest management
dc.subject.otherAuthKeyword protected areas
dc.subject.otherAuthKeyword web-spinning sawfly
dc.subject.otherIndex Animalia
dc.subject.otherIndex cedrus
dc.subject.otherIndex cedrus libani
dc.subject.otherIndex cephalcia
dc.subject.otherIndex hexapoda
dc.subject.otherIndex pamphiliidae


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